“Sir, This Fair is Lame. There Are No Girls.”

I’ve had a busy few weeks over the course of this month. I much prefer to post my blogs in order that things are happening, but at this point, I think it’s best to just post what I can for now and then back track later if time allows. I think, in the end, it’s nice to have too much material, rather than too little. This way, I’m not scraping the bottom of the barrel, trying to come up with something interesting to say. Life down here, life in Guyana, is really never dull though. A lot of the time, the things that keep me from posting are simply lack of access to internet and general exhaustion. If there were thirty hours in a day…I’d have a little better luck.

A little less than a week ago, my mother was here visiting from the United States. We spent one week exploring different parts of Guyana and getting her acquainted with what my life looks like on a daily basis. I hope to write more about her trip in the coming weeks. School has also resumed and is back in full swing. My students and I find ourselves quickly gliding toward the conclusion of the school year, which will happen in just over two months. It’s hard to believe their time in grade 5 will be over so soon.

That being said, I’ve taken a little more time out of my days to spend time with the boys in my class outside of the classroom. Yesterday, two of the guys joined my housemates and me at a local church fair.

Collect all the clothespins in one hand without dropping any to win a prize.

Collect all the clothespins in one hand without dropping any to win a prize.

Similar to the church fair I attended and wrote about in the fall, this one was filled with fun, old-fashioned games, pony rides, a variety of ethnic foods, and many familiar faces. Thankfully, each of the boys was given a little money to spend on games and food, so I wasn’t pulling cash out of my own pocket. However, I did get to experience what I would refer to as a couple of “dad moments” as I found myself slowly handing out tokens throughout the afternoon and evening. Then, as more and more games were played, my arms began to fill up with the prizes the boys couldn’t carry while they played other games.

The fair.

The fair.

The fair took place at a large cricket field around the corner from our home. It was an easy walk over. The large amount of space made it look at though there weren’t many things to do, but really, you just had to be ready to walk from each game to the next, or each food booth to the next. The fair was also infiltrated with speakers, strategically placed throughout the grounds. Of course, the music was being played juuuust a little too loud.

One of the games my two boys played involved putting a pair of tights on their heads and swinging a ball back and forth. It doesn’t make much sense, but it was hilarious to watch. Pictures are the only way to make sense of this game, so here you go:

You have thirty seconds to knock over all five water bottles with the tights on your head.

You have thirty seconds to knock over all five water bottles with the tights on your head.

Older boys cheering on my boys.

Older boys cheering on my boys.

Go, go, go!

Go, go, go!

So, that was the fair. I think the guys had an enjoyable time. At the end of the day, one of them said he had a nice time, which is rare for him to say. The other said he didn’t have a nice time, which is ten-year-old speak for, “I had a nice time.” By the time we were boarding the bus and heading back to the orphanage, it was dark. Some of the older boys from the orphanage were in attendance at the fair, so they got to experience the fun too, even if they did say it was lame. One of them ended up winning a thousand dollars ($5USD) and asked me to hold onto it for him so it doesn’t get stolen from him at the orphanage. Ah, life at a Guyanese orphanage…

#diabolical

#diabolical

King of the fair.

King of the fair.

All in all, things in Guyana are going fine. The election season is really starting to heat up. For the longest time, I had no worries about what being in the capital would mean during this unique time, but I’m seeing more and more recently how things could escalate, get a little nasty. The party that is currently in control and “the opposition” are both rallying hard. Commercials are popping up more and more on both the television and the radio. The campaign posters on the streets and around town are getting larger and growing in numbers. And, best of all–or, most entertaining for me–there are flags for each party hanging on almost every street lamp around this city. As soon as one party puts up a flag, the other has to follow suit. The only posts that don’t have one of each party represented are the posts where people have come along and torn down the opposing parties flag. It’s all so comical and, like I said before, very middle school, very student government.

That’s just a brief run down for you. Have a good one.

About mattylife

"And no one is a stranger...for long."
This entry was posted in Guyana, South America and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to “Sir, This Fair is Lame. There Are No Girls.”

  1. Larry says:

    Very interesting post. That game with the tights, ball, and bottles looks like fun – and hilarious.

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